Malignant effusions contain lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-like activity.

Abstract

CONCLUSION

These data suggest a role for LPA-like lipids in the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer and possibly that of other predominantly intraperitoneal malignancies.

BACKGROUND

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are bioactive phospholipids with mitogenic and growth factor-like activities that act via specific cell-surface receptors present in many normal and transformed cell types. LPA has recently been implicated as a growth factor present in ascites of ovarian cancer patients. The presence of LPA-like activity and the hypothesis that levels of this bioactivity in effusions of ovarian cancer patients are higher than those in effusions of other cancer patients was studied.

RESULTS

Average LPA-equivalent levels were 50.2 microns (range 5.4-200) for all patients, and 94.5 microns (range 15-200) for ovarian cancer patients (P = 0.004). There were no additional independent significant correlations between LPA-equivalent levels in effusions and a range of other biochemical and clinical characteristics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A neurite retraction bioassay in a neuroblastoma cell line previously developed for in vitro detection of LPA activity on cell lines was employed and bioactivity was expressed in virtual LPA-equivalent levels. LPA-equivalent levels were tested in effusions of 62 patients with a range of malignancies, including 13 ovarian cancer patients. Biochemical and clinical parameters were evaluated for correlations with LPA-equivalent levels.

More about this publication

Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • Volume 9
  • Issue nr. 4
  • Pages 437-42
  • Publication date 01-04-1998

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