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Gene Regulation

Divisions

Groups within research area Gene Regulation

BasVanSteensel.jpg

Bas van Steensel

Division
Gene Regulation
Specialisation
Chromatin Genomics

Introduction

How is DNA folded inside the cell nucleus? How is DNA packaged by hundreds of chromatin proteins? And how do DNA folding and packaging regulate gene expression? These fascinating questions are of fundamental interest and highly relevant to our understanding of cancer and other diseases. Our attempts to solve these questions by developing new genomics techniques that can provide new views of the spatial organization of DNA, and how chromatin proteins work together to package and regulate the genome.

More about the Bas van Steensel group

De Wit, Elzo

Elzo de Wit

Division
Gene Regulation
Specialisation

Introduction

The human genome is a four-dimensional map of our body. It contains instructions where and when in our body a gene or protein needs to be expressed. Charting the spatio-temporal aspects of gene expression is one of the great challenges in systems biology. My group is interested in on the one hand identifying regulatory mutations that affect gene expression. On the other hand we want to understand the role genome storage plays in the regulation of genes.

More about the Elzo de Wit group

FredVanLeeuwen.jpg

Fred van Leeuwen

Division
Gene Regulation
Specialisation

Introduction

Beginning his scientific career at the NKI working on African trypanosomes, Fred van Leeuwen developed an interest in epigenetics - the process by which genes are stably switched on or off - and he returned in 2003 to establish his own research group on the topic. Although an identical set of genes is found in every cell in the body they are not all in the same on or off state, which allows each cell to function differently. These patterns of gene activity are also passed on to future cell generations. Fred's group is interested in how cells maintain their identity and pass on this memory of gene activity to daughter cells through cell division, which can lead to insights into the development of cancer.

More about the Fred van Leeuwen group

Tineke Lenstra

Tineke Lenstra

Division
Gene Regulation
Specialisation
Transcription dynamics

Introduction

Our lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms of transcription regulation in eukaryotic cells. In the last half century, our knowledge of gene expression has greatly advanced, but the majority of measurements come from large populations of cells. However, as a result of the stochastic nature of transcriptional process itself, cells can exhibit considerable heterogeneity in transcriptional responses. This stochastic gene expression variation can influence essential cell fate decisions, such as the decision to go into apoptosis. Diseases such as cancer often start when individual cells start acting aberrantly, illustrating the importance of single-cell approaches to study biological processes.

More about the Tineke Lenstra group

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