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Biological Stress Response

Divisions

Groups within research area Biological Stress Response

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Hein te Riele

Division
Biological Stress Response
Specialisation
Genomic instability and cancer

Introduction

Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and can be caused by failing DNA repair mechanisms or deregulated cell cycle control. Our research involves both aspects focusing on (1) the role of the DNA mismatch repair system in mutation avoidance and (2) the role of defective cell cycle checkpoints in promoting genome stability. The principle tools include gene modification in murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) and analyses of the phenotypic consequences in ESCs, mutant mice and cell lines derived thereof.

More about the Hein te Riele group

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Marcel Verheij

Division
Biological Stress Response
Specialisation
Targeted Radiosensitization

Introduction

Marcel Verheij combines his clinical activities as a radiation oncologist at the Antoni vanLeeuwenhoek Hospital with translational research in the adjacent NKI. This helps him keep his laboratory work focused on clinical need, and his clinical work scientifically up to date. A two-year fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York during his residency-PhD program sparked an interest in apoptosis, or programmed cell death. This led to his current line of research investigating the mechanisms of radiation-induced cell death with a view to designing more effective combined treatment strategies by identifying tumor targeted agents that increase the cytotoxic effect of radiation.

More about the Marcel Verheij group

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Heinz Jacobs

Division
Biological Stress Response
Specialisation
Programmed Mutagenesis

Introduction

Heinz Jacobs started as a graduate student at the NKI in 1987, and drawn by its excellent research environment returned in 2002 to establish his own group. The main activities in his laboratory focus on how DNA is mutated during the process of programmed mutagenesis, and its role in the somatic evolution of cancer. Programmed mutagenesis is part of the normal development of specialized immune cells known as B-lymphocytes. B cells generate antibodies that recognize pathogens, and programmed mutagenesis, which involves DNA damage, is essential for the production of a diverse antibody arsenal. DNA damage also leads to mutations and cancer, so understanding the processes involved can provide valuable insights into the cause and treatment of cancer. Our approaches involve basic and advanced molecular genetics, biochemistry, immunology, recombinant mouse genetics, and next generation sequencing.

More about the Heinz Jacobs group

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Reuven Agami

Division
Biological Stress Response
Specialisation
Controlling cancer by RNA

Introduction

The goal of Reuven Agami's research is to generate a better understanding of the molecular processes leading to human cancer. His strategy is to identify essential cancer genes and pathways, and he is particularly interested in the role of RNA. RNA is a versatile molecule and the human genome expresses many different types. Interestingly, only a small fraction of these encodes for proteins, while most regulate protein production and therefore control cell behavior. His group develops and utilizes novel RNA tools to alter gene expression and thereby influence cancer cell fate. They hope to generate knowledge that can be used to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for treating cancer.

More about the Reuven Agami group

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